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Wenatchee Valley
Wenatchee Valley
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8 questions
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Discussion

Irrigation: A time for prayer

I followed the filling up of the Wenatchee Reclamation District's canals on Monday. It's a sign of spring and new life as the water is used in orchards and lawns up and down the Wenatchee Valley. For me, it's a time to pray as I'm the manager of my neighborhood's irrigation system. It's a system my father was instrumental in upgrading some 40ish years ago and there is always intrepidation as I turn the valve on at the ditch letting it rush into the pipes that run past houses and along streets on the way to my house and those around me. Will this be the year the pipe springs a leak? I came across a couple working on their neighborhood irrigation line earlier Monday and they had the same concerns. 

World photo/Don Seabrook        Marty Howard with the Wenatchee Reclamation District pulls trash off of a brush rack as water flows into the irrigation ditch for the first time this year above Sunnyslope Monday, April 4, 2022. Nate Bratton operates a scoop in the background.
World photo/Don Seabrook        Marty Howard with the Wenatchee Reclamation District pulls trash off of a brush rack as water flows into the irrigation ditch for the first time this year above Sunnyslope Monday, April 4, 2022. Nate Bratton operates a scoop in the background.
Discussion

How deep is the snow?

The measurements are in, one Wenatchee resident recorded roughly two feet of snow while clearing his front entryway, Thursday morning along Yakima Street.

 

Discussion

Sandwiches, we all eat them

I was tasked with finding my two best stories from 2021 last month. Reflecting back on the people I have interviewed and news I have covered left a couple clear winners, one of those being a story about Clyde Pangborn's long-forgotten lunch.

Here's a little backstory on the piece: I first heard about the preserved sandwich while watching a video from the Wenatchee Museum & Cultural Center’s YouTube page. The idea of keeping a sandwich struck me as unusual but not newsworthy until my editor, Marco Martinez, struck some sense into me.

“There's a story there, seriously,” Martinez told me. From that point on, the mystery of Clyde Pangborn’s long-forgotten lunch unfolded. Who cares about an old piece of bread? I do. And that’s why I wrote a story about it.

Read more stories of the year here

Clyde Pangborn's sandwich, preserved since 1926, sits in the the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center's temperature-controlled archive room. (World photo/Luke Hollister)
Clyde Pangborn's sandwich, preserved since 1926, sits in the the Wenatchee Valley Museum & Cultural Center's temperature-controlled archive room. (World photo/Luke Hollister)
Discussion

It was 108 degrees six months ago

It's snowy now but remember that heatwave last summer?

Six months ago the Wenatchee world sent its reporter staff out across town to document one of the hottest days in Wenatchee's recorded history. During my very dehydrating day I took a ride on an ice cream truck to chat with people as they escaped the heat, but it was too hot and very few customers came out for ice cream. Yes, that's correct, too hot for ice cream. 

Here's a couple photos I took June 28.

Deanne Langston, owner of Twin T's Ice Cream, hands out an ice cream treat to a young customer on June 28 near the Eastmont Community Park.
Deanne Langston, owner of Twin T's Ice Cream, hands out an ice cream treat to a young customer on June 28 near the Eastmont Community Park.
Gary Langston, Twin T’s Ice Cream owner, works in the back of his ice cream truck during the 108 degree afternoon heat, June 28 near the Eastmont Community Park.
Gary Langston, Twin T’s Ice Cream owner, works in the back of his ice cream truck during the 108 degree afternoon heat, June 28 near the Eastmont Community Park.